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Seasonal Work and the Job Hunt

Is it possible to turn seasonal work into a full-time position? Absolutely, but it is not easy. Not every seasonal worker can transition to full-time employee. Remember, the reason why the company hired the seasonal workers – because they have a short-term boost in demand that requires short-term help. Most seasonal work comes with a finite end date. When the need for help dries up, you will be let go, unless you impress the employer enough that your end date is extended or an offer of full-time employment is made. There are definite things that you can do to help that process along.

The key is you. You will not be handed a full-time work gig simply because you are “present”. You need to show management that you are a “high value” employee. Today, managers emphasize value when deciding who makes the transition from seasonal worker to full-time employee. Now, this judgment is based on perception – it is subjective to a certain degree, but there are 6 things that you can do every day to increase your value and therefore your chances:

  1. Go above and beyond – No matter the job, there are always opportunities to learn something. Training and education provide value to your boss. Remember, you have been brought on to help during the company’s busy season. By taking the initiative to learn new skills and providing your employer with the flexibility to better utilize your skill sets, you are providing value.
  2. Embrace your workplace – Every company has something strange about it. Usually there is something trivial about the way that a company operates – its facilities, its employees, etc. – that is bothersome. Look past it. Nothing in life is perfect – from the people you interact with every day to the processes you have to undergo to get the job done to the time it takes you to get to the job.Tolerance and the ability to find workarounds is the stamp of a high-value employee. Whining, complaining and antagonism are not.
  3. Be a team player – Go with the flow, and be nice to everyone you meet and work with. Do not badmouth, gossip or give anyone attitude We have all heard about the need for “cultural fit” within the organization. This simply means how well a new worker can get along with others currently on the team. If you cannot, then you will have no opportunity to come on board full time.
  4. Show up on time – No one wants to hire an unreliable employee. Reliability provides value, and something as simple as showing up on time and not extending your breaks provides that value
  5. Remain productive – By its very nature, seasonal work is designed to provide coverage during an extremely hectic time of the year. The longer the “season” the higher the probability that a worker’s productivity will start to fizzle out. Focus on learning your job quickly and to do things without being told. Diligence, perseverance, and being proactive all add value, and that is what managers remember when it comes time to hire full-time employees.
  6. Speak up – Finally, if you do not let your managers know that you are interested in becoming a full-time employee then all other advice is moot. No one is a mind reader and many seasonal workers simply want nothing more than a little extra spending money (to use when they return to school in the fall or to spend on Christmas presents). If you do not fall into either of those categories, let management know.

Remember, value succeeds. High value employees may lose jobs (due to downsizing or closure or simple bad luck), but they get new jobs. If you continue to provide value – no matter the job, no matter the job duties – you will be successful in landing your best-fit job.

Consider Snelling as part of your job search. We have offices across the nation and a talented staff that is ready to help you find your best-fit opportunity. Find your local Snelling office and begin your online job search today!

Snelling Corporate Office

4055 Valley View Lane, Suite #700
Dallas, TX, 75244

(800) 411-6401

(972) 239-7575